To us “Your eyewear is always your outfit and your clothing outfit is always your accessory”. – Coco & Breezy

The twin sisters Corianna and Brianna Dotson also known as Coco & Breezy call themselves walking billboards for their brand, and after seeing them in person for the first time, that statement couldn’t be more true. Dressed similarly in all black with Pharrell-esque top hats, the twins were a cool reflection of each other shielded by their accessory of choice, Coco & Breezy shades.

Through a session of Game Changers Vol.3, we learned of their story, their success and failures, and how they stayed true to themselves despite the critical comments made by the outside world.

Hailing from their hometown of Apple Valley , Minnesota, the girls juggled not one but three jobs on top of their school commitments while chasing a dream. Graduating months earlier than the rest of their class, the girls ventured off to NYC with no money or a place to stay, but what fuelled them was the idea that they would dominate the city with their fashion ambition. Utilizing their bold style and avant-garde taste which caused them to draw odd stares in their community, they created their first pair of sunglasses, a single studded item that sparked the developed of their business and a career in customized accessories at the mere age of 19.

Eyewear gave these girls another level of confidence and although they may seem confident and exude this naturally cool vibe, Coco and Breezy admits that they’re actually really shy.

In life there’s not always highs, but it’s the lows points of the journey that makes one realize that the road to success never comes easy. They got their first month’s deposit and rent by walking around NYC seven days a week, and people walking by would stop and ask to buy their glasses off their faces. There were times when sales were slow and rent couldn’t be paid, but because of the way these girls hustled day in and day out working away in their tiny shared apartment in Brooklyn which they lived in during the starting days of their business, they always managed to pull through.

Their first collection was called 20/20, representing a vision of the future of fashion when the glasses are on and when they’re off it becomes a blank space that represents the people on earth that doesn’t understand you. The rainy days collection was inspired by the shadow of the raindrops on umbrellas and it represents the tears of the girls being timid and the confidence they have when the shield (the glasses) are on.

Bringing fashion and art with music as their inspiration, these girls place all those things in their product creation process. Not wanting to chase fame for the sake of fame, Coco and Breezy seek to be inspirational and use their growing recognition as a vehicle to accomplish greater and bigger goals.

Since the official launch Coco & Breezy have been featured in numerous publications such as Teen Vogue, WWD, Cosmopolitan, Glamour, Nylon, New York Magazine, InStyle, Paper, Essence, GQ, Timeout, Grazia, Biba, Idol, Dazed, ID, and more.

They have developed their business and product by working on diverse creative projects such as eyewear collaborations with Selima Salaun and Adidas, a Copy and Paste Clothier collaboration designing a limited edition varsity jacket, and a ski helmet collaboration with Allen Vaurnet in Courchevel, France.  Along with their collaborative work they worked with Renault, becoming the faces for a large advertising campaign.

For those who are interested in creating your own sunglasses, Coco & Breezy teach a intro to eyewear design here. And for more information on the girls and their brand check out their website Coco & Breezy.

 

[vimeo 103814775 w=500 h=281]

Coco and Breezy “Translucent Creatures” Stop Motion Film from Coco and breezy on Vimeo.

Comments

About The Author

Lucy Weng
Collaborator / Web Editor
Google+

A writer and fashion design student currently based in Montreal, Lucy is the overseer behind the ultimate secret address book for all things to eat, see, do, and experience within this artistic city. When she's not working, the Toronto native splits her off time traveling between various cities in search of new discoveries.

Dress To Kill Feed