These days, Camille Poliquin and Laurence Lafond-Beaulne from the band Milk & Bone have created a musical buzz on internet with only three songs. As you read this, their first album has been launched only hours ago.

 
They both arrive five minutes apart at an espresso bar on Prince-Arthur.  Their bond seems to be very strong. They can’t stop talking about millions of things. When I ask them how long it has been since they saw each other, Camille replies with a smile, “we were hanging out last night, but we always have something to talk about.” They are nothing short of lovable. It was a pleasure to sit down and talk to them. So much so that our interview almost turned out to be exclusively about food. Between discussing homemade breakfast and a sipping coffee, I seized the occasion to learn more about their upcoming album, Little Mourning.

“We didn’t make an album thinking about the commercial aspect of it. We simply decided to create something that we like and made us feel proud. We never try to create music that fits into a mold. It is simply meant to reach people”, explains Laurence.

“I often get the impression that if we had decided to create a commercial album, people would have ended up feeling it. We simply wanted to create very strong songs, regardless if they would be commercial or underground. It think you can understand that while listening to our music.” adds Camille.
When I ask them if the whole point of their album is simply to fulfil their dreams regardless if it works or not, they are quick to respond.

“It’s not even about trying, we simply made this album for ourselves. Everything that will come after this will only be a beautiful surprise.”

The lyrics of Milk & Bone are very personal and raw. They are a far cry from girly lyrics about hopeless love that we used to hear from female singers. It feels as if they are not afraid to sing about the way things actually are, no matter the subject. For example, their single New York is about adultery. When I ask them if they think the new generation of female artists are afraid of exploring sensitive subjects Laurence responds, “ I think there have always been some artists who stand out, but these last few years, women are less shy to express things…that are maybe not well seen [laughs]” says Laurence.

“It is refreshing and I think people like hearing about a strong woman’s opinion, no matter their gender”,explains Camille. “We write songs about what we are living through and we are not going to hide our feelings just so people don’t get offended. When we started, the album was only supposed to be a project for fun. That situation kind of freed us from any pressure.”

“WE JUST WANT TO FEEL great WHILE DOING MAKING MUSIC AND MAKE OTHERS FEEL GREAT AS  WELL. WE WANT THAT THE PEOPLE LISTENING TO OUR music don’t FEEL ALONE IN ANY SITUATION THEY ARE GOING THROUGH.” 

With only three singles so far, I am curious to know if these songs are a clear representation of what we can find on their album.

“I think those three songs covered all the aspects of the album. For example Coconut has more of a girly summer vibe while New York is darker and has more elaborate musical arrangements. Pressure is minimal and kind of sexy. The others songs evolve around them. We are always in an electro aspect, but with an organic vibe. Our voices are almost never altered” says Laurence.

Another strong aspect of the band is their minimal aesthetic. From the black and white clothing they wear on stage to the visual impact of their video clips, minimalism seems to be a big part of their musical act.
“It is important for us to have a well curated image. We want people to be able to associate us with a specific visual energy. I have people sending me pictures of marble because they saw it and thought of Milk & Bone. That is exactly what we want!” explains Camille.

Once you see their video clip for New York, their black and white images begin to haunt you. There is one scene in particular where the girls have their faces covered by pieces of black fabric and you can imagine them hanging from the sky.

“It was Mégane Voghell’s idea –  it was her fist clip! She is crazy talented. She now does all the live projections during our shows. She adds a lot to our visual identity”, explains Laurence.

“Our strong branding helped us book shows when we only had two songs. We went to perform at a showcase in Paris and we are playing at the SXSW Festival the day after the launch of our album. We are absolutely looking to play more outside the country.”

Once, I left the coffee shop where they waited for the next journalist to arrive, I could still see them chatting away with energy. There is something about these two that make you wish they get all the success they deserve in the future.

-Milk & Bone album is now available in stores and online

All the pictures are the work of Oumayma B. Tanfous, a based Montreal photographer. Through her unique vision, she delivers intimist portrait of musical artists for Dress To Kill. You can explore her work here.

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Written on: March 18, 2015