Full disclosure: I have a tendency to hold figures, like Leandra Medine, to mythological standards of perfection. It’s only natural given that her particular brand of self-aware, feminist fashion badass cannot be replicated (trust me, I’ve tried).

by Valerie Silva

Although Medine’s website attracts over one millions fashion devotees each month, she has said, “the Man Repeller ethos isn’t about fashion. It’s much more about a woman feeling comfortable in her own skin, and we’re using fashion as the vehicle to discuss this sense of self-confidence.” Her commitment to truly empowering women is proven by her refusal to engage with fashion as mere commodity. Although regularly approached for sponsored reviews and paid Instagram advertisements, Medine rejects all offers in an effort to protect her website’s editorial integrity and her readers’ trust, above all else.

 

 

What started off as a personal blog championing the fashion trends that women love and men hate, has swiftly evolved into a full-scale fashion and lifestyle website and a multi-person, multi-functional head office in New York City. At just 28, Leandra already has a book under her belt and collaborations with the likes of Maje, Stuart Weitzman, and Saks Fifth Avenue. Her most recent initiative includes the launch of two addictive podcasts. The first, “Oh Boy,” hosted by filmmaker Jay Buim, features one-on-one conversation with trailblazing women. The second, “Monocycle,” Leandra’s pet project, is a ten minute monologue about “feelings, feelings, what it’s like to feel feelings”—namely her own. With it, she hopes to foster an even deeper, more open relationship with her readers and listeners.

 

 

Leandra’s satirical theorizations of trends allow her to approach the fashion stratosphere in an ethically conscious way; wide legged pants and arm parties are not the end-all for her. She has built a community of designer/writer friends and loyal followers. She skips out on fashion week to spend Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur with her family. And, she inspires women to think through social issues each and every day. The truth is little about her is repellent.

 

 

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