“The world is in perpetual motion, and we must invent the things of tomorrow. One must go before others, be determined and exacting, and let your intelligence direct your life. Act with audacity.” Barbe-Nicole Ponsardin Clicquot

 

For International Women’s Day, we look back on how Madame Clicquot tirelessly conquered new markets ultimately becoming an audacious leader of her time.

After the tragic passing of her husband in October 1805, Madame Clicquot used her tenacious character to convince her father-in-law to let her manage the business, despite being a new widow with a three-year-old daughter. As a true pioneer, she pushed forward with her  keen innovative eye for production and driving the evolution of her products. One of her most notable inventions was the riddling rack; a studied structure  allowing for a more efficient aging  process responsible for the quality of the Champagne, still widely used around the world. Opportunistic and tough, the young widow transformed the small house into a global empire.

Madame Clicquot exploited the chaos created by Napoleonic wars into an opportunity to tap into the European market, before expanding into Russia and then, the United States.

La Grande Dame was created in 1962 and was launched in 1972 (marking the 200th anniversary of the brand), as an homage to her determination and vision.

A clever mix of Champagne the region, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, La Grande Dame is the result of a perfect balance between power and elegance resulting in freshness, great character, and delicacy. Each wine is aged patiently for at least six years in the depths of the Crayères (chalk cellars),  time a contributing factor to its ultimate splendor. With its personality and uniqueness, La Grande Dame gives the House of Veuve Clicquot its quintessential style. The 2008 vintage of Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame, which was release last year, is nearly 95% Pinot Noir, compared to 53% (and 47% Chardonnay) for the 2006 vintage

So pour yourself a glass, and raise it to a true visionary, Madame Clicquot.

 

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